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The Caml Hump: Publishing

Major applications
Active-DVI [29-Aug-2011, version 1.10.0, Stable] Has a documentation
Active-DVI is a Unix-platform DVI previewer and a programmable presenter for slides written in LaTeX.
Major applications
Ant [19-Dec-2007, version 0.8, Beta] Has a documentation
Ant is not TeX. It is a typesetting system similar to TeX. The current version is written in Objective Caml.
Others
Bibgrep [09-Feb-2004, version 0.51, Beta]
Bibgrep indexes and searches BibTex files for entries matching a given query. Its usage is similar to the command ``grep'' and the queries uses a Google-like syntax.
Major applications
Bibtex2html [01-Jan-2004, version 0.69, Stable] Has a documentation
bibtex2html is a collection of tools for translating from BibTeX to HTML. They allow to produce, from a set of bibliography files in BibTeX format, a bibliography in HTML format.
Bindings with C libraries
Blahcaml [18-Feb-2010, version 2.0, Stable]
Blahcaml provides basic Ocaml bindings to the Blahtex library. Blahtex is written in C++, and aims at the conversion of TeX equations into MathML.
Author: Dario Teixeira.
Others
Bmktrans [15-Mar-2002, version 3.0, Stable] Has a documentation
Bookmark translator and pretty printer.
Author: Pierre Boulet.
Development tools
caml2html [26-Nov-2002, Stable]
A tool to create hilighted html pages from OCaml files (.ml, .mli, .mll and .mly).
Native OCaml libraries
Camlhilight [18-Feb-2010, version 1.0, Beta] Has a documentation
Camlhighlight provides syntax highlighting and pretty-printing facilities for displaying code samples in Ocsigen applications. The library works by parsing the output of Highlight, a widely available application supporting the most common programming and markup languages.
Author: Dario Teixeira.
Native OCaml libraries
CamlPDF [15-Mar-2010, version 0.5, Beta] Has a documentation
CamlPDF is a library for reading, writing and manipulating PDF files and data.
Author: John Whitington.
Development tools
CamlTemplate [31-May-2005, version 1.0, Stable] Has a Godi packageHas a documentation
A small template processor library for Objective Caml. It can be used to generate web pages, scripts, SQL queries, XML documents and other sorts of text files.
Author: Benjamin Geer.
Development tools
CCSS [11-Mar-2010, version 1.1, Stable] Has a documentation
CCSS is a preprocessor/pretty-printer for CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). It extends the CSS language with support for declaration of variables and basic arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division). The programme is supposed to be used as a filter: it reads the CSS source from stdin and outputs its result on stdout.
Author: Dario Teixeira.
Web application
GikiWiki [17-Feb-2005, Beta]
GikiWiki is a minimalist wiki in OCaml.
Author: Neale Pickett.
Native OCaml libraries
GraphPS [31-May-2002, version 1.0, Stable] Has a documentation
GraphPS is an Objective Caml module that allows generating PostScript graphic. Its interface is almost identical to that of the Graphics module of the distribution, so that it is easy to switch.
Author: Pierre Weis.
Camlp4 extensions
HereDoc [09-Aug-2001, version 2000-12-20, Stable] Has a Godi package
Syntactic sugar for text producing applications.
Author: Alain Frisch.
Major applications
Hevea [10-Sep-2012, version 2.00, Mature] Has a Godi packageHas a documentationHas a tutorial
A quite complete and fast LATEX to HTML translator written in Objective Caml.
Author: Luc Maranget.
Development tools
Highlight [28-Mar-2007, version 2.4.8, Stable] Has a documentation
Highlight converts source code to formatted text with syntax highlighting. Features include coloured output in HTML, XHTML, RTF, TeX, LaTeX and XML format; Support for 120+ programming languages; include 40 colour themes; platform independent; customizable and easy to use. OCaml is also supported.
Author: Andre Simon.
Others
htmlc [24-Sep-2009, version 2.21, Stable] Has a documentation
htmlc is used to produce regular HTML pages from source files that contain text fragments that require some computation to be written. Those text fragments can be for instance the last modification date of a page, or parts of HTML pages that must be systematically included in all the pages of an entire WEB site.
Author: Pierre Weis.
Native OCaml libraries
Melt [24-Mar-2009, version 1.1.0, Beta] Has a documentation
Melt is a set of libraries and tools which allows you to program LaTeX documents using OCaml. This combines the typesetting power of LaTeX with the programming power of OCaml. It can be combined with Mlpost to include figures.
Author: Romain Bardou.
Native OCaml libraries
ML-Postscript [10-Aug-2001, Development code] Has a documentation
A library to produce PostScript documents.
Author: Nicolas George.
Native OCaml libraries
MLGraph [27-Sep-2002, Stable] Has a documentation
An Objective Caml library to produce PostScript images.
Scientific software
Mlpost [20-Apr-2010, version 0.8.0, Beta] Has a documentation
An Ocaml interface to MetaPost, a powerful software to draw pictures to be embedded in LaTeX documents.
Development tools
OCamlTex [31-Jul-2006, version 0.6, Beta]
OCamlTeX is a combination of an OCaml script and LaTeX style file that, together, give the user the ability to define LaTeX macros in terms of OCaml code. Once defined, a OCaml macro becomes indistinguishable from any other LaTeX macro. OCamlTeX thereby combines LaTeX's typesetting power with OCaml's programmability.
Others
Sebib [19-Apr-2010, version 1.0.0, Stable] Has a documentation
Sebib means "S-Expressions for BIBliography", it provides a hackable Bibliographic References Management System.
Others
Stog [20-Mar-2013, version 0.8.0, Beta] Has a documentation
Stog is a kind of Jekyll in OCaml: It is a static web site generator, able to handle blog posts as well as regular pages.
Author: Maxence Guesdon.
Scientific software
Texexpand [29-Aug-2011, Development code]
This project contains an OCaml re-implementation of some popular utilities like texexpand and delatex that were commonplace in the late 1990’s on all TeX/LaTeX user machines.