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[Caml-list] Weird types
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Date: -- (:)
From: Tyng-Ruey Chuang <trc@i...>
Subject: Re: [Caml-list] Weird types
Berke Durak wrote:
> 
> I have a type
> 
> type ('a,'b,'c,'d,'e,'f,'g) sigma =
>         I of 'a * 'b * 'c * 'd * 'e * 'f * 'g
>   | T of ('b,'a,'c,'d,'e,'f,'g) sigma
>   | P of ('b,'c,'d,'e,'f,'g,'a) sigma
> 
> and a function
> 
> let rec gamma = function
>         I _ -> 0 |
>         T x -> 1 + (gamma x) |
>         P x -> 1 + (gamma x)
> 
> and want a version of gamma that works on the following data
> 
> type t1 = X1 and t2 = X2 and t3 = X3 and
> t4 = X4 and t5 = X5 and t6 = X6 and t7 = X7
> 
> let data = I(X1,X2,X3,X4,X5,X6,X7)
> 
> and that is under 10K of length. Any clever way to solve this ? ....


I am not sure people at INRIA will recommend this, but one can
use Obj.magic to coerce the compiler to accept unsafe value definitions.
For example, 

	let rec gamma s =
	    match s with 
	          I _ -> 0
	        | T x -> 1 + Obj.magic gamma x
	        | P x -> 1 + Obj.magic gamma x
                 
will be inferred as

	val gamma : ('a, 'b, 'c, 'd, 'e, 'f, 'g) sigma -> int = <fun>

In this particular case, function gamma is safe to have the above type
because, by its definition, values of types 'a, 'b, 'c, 'd, 'e, 'f, and
'g
are always ignored.

If we define 

	let i = I (X1, X2, X3, X4, X5, X6, X7)
	let rec t  n = if n <= 0 then i   else T (t' (n-1))
	    and t' n = if n <= 0 then T i else T (t  (n-1)) 

then (t (2*k)) will return a "length (2*k)" sigma value, and
(t' (2*k+1)) will return a "length (2*k+1)" sigma value. Functions t
and t' are nicely inferred by the compiler to have types

	val t :  int -> (t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7) sigma = <fun>
	val t' : int -> (t2, t1, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7) sigma = <fun>

Troubles are, (t (2*k-1)) also has length (2*k).
Also, (t' (2*k)) has length (2*k+1). This is no good,
but one probably cannot do better.

It can also be inferred that sigma values of the same length may
not have the same type. (P (t (2*k))) and (t' (2*k+1)) both have
length (2*k+1), but with different types:

	let t'10k1 = t' 10001
	let t10k   = t  10000
	let pt10k  = P  t10k

	let (u, v) = (gamma pt10k, gamma t'10k1) 

We get

	val t'10k1 : (t2, t1, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7) sigma = ...
	val t10k   : (t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7) sigma = ...
	val pt10k  : (t7, t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6) sigma = ...
	val u : int = 10001
	val v : int = 10001


By the way, people call type constructors like sigma "irregular":
sigma is applied to different type expresions at the two sides 
of the its own type equation.

A self-contained code fragment is appended for your amusement.
Have fun!

Tyng-Ruey Chuang

--------------------

type ('a, 'b, 'c, 'd, 'e, 'f, 'g) sigma =
     I of 'a * 'b * 'c * 'd *'e * 'f * 'g
  |  T of ('b, 'a, 'c, 'd, 'e, 'f, 'g) sigma
  |  P of ('b, 'c, 'd, 'e, 'f, 'g, 'a) sigma

let rec gamma s =
    match s with 
          I _ -> 0
        | T x -> 1 + Obj.magic gamma x
        | P x -> 1 + Obj.magic gamma x
                 
type t1 = X1 
 and t2 = X2
 and t3 = X3
 and t4 = X4
 and t5 = X5
 and t6 = X6
 and t7 = X7

let i = I (X1, X2, X3, X4, X5, X6, X7)
let rec t  n = if n <= 0 then i   else T (t' (n-1))
    and t' n = if n <= 0 then T i else T (t  (n-1)) 

let t'10k1 = t' 10001
let t10k   = t  10000
let pt10k  = P  t10k

let (u, v) = (gamma pt10k, gamma t'10k1)
-------------------
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