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Commercial Users of Functional Programming: call for speaker nominations
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Date: -- (:)
From: Simon Peyton-Jones <simonpj@m...>
Subject: Commercial Users of Functional Programming: call for speaker nominations
Commercial Users of Functional Programming (CUFP) 2007
                Oct 4 2007, Freiburg, Germany

=== Call for speaker nominations and talk proposals ===

Functional languages have been under academic development for
over 25 years, and remain fertile ground for programming language
research. Recently, however, developers in industrial,
government, and open source projects have begun to use functional
languages very successfully in practical applications. In these
settings, functional programming has often provided dramatic
leverage, including whole new ways of thinking about the original
problem.

The goal of the CUFP workshop is to act as a voice for these
users of functional languages. The workshop supports the
increasing viability of functional programming in the commercial,
governmental, and open-source space by providing a forum for FP
professionals to share their experiences and ideas, whether those
ideas are related to business, management, or engineering. The
workshop is also designed to enable the formation and
reinforcement of relationships that further the commercial use of
functional languages.


                 Speaking at CUFP

If you use functional programming as a means, rather than as an
end, this message is an invitation for you to offer to give a
talk at the workshop. Alternatively, you may know someone else
who would give a good talk: please nominate them.

Talks are typically about 30-45 minutes long, but can be shorter.
They aim to inform participants about how functional programming
played out in real-world applications, focusing especially on the
re-usable lessons learned, or insights gained.

Your talk does not need to be highly technical; for this
audience, reflections on the commercial, management, or software
engineering aspects are, if anything, more important. You do not
need to submit a paper!

If you are interested in offering a talk, or nominating someone
to do so, send an e-mail to kfisher at research.att.com or
simonpj at microsoft.com by June 1, 2007 with a short description
of what you'd like to talk about or what you think your nominee
should give a talk about. Such descriptions should be roughly a
page in length.