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Date: -- (:)
From: Yitzhak Mandelbaum <yitzhak@r...>
Subject: Re: [Caml-list] ocamllex and python-style indentation
To restart this thread, do your solutions handle the following (legal)  
variation of the original example?

if True:
    x = 3+4
    y = (2 +
4 + 5)
    z = 5
else:
    x = 5
    if False:
        x = 8
        z = 2


Notice that the assignment of y wraps onto the next line at an  
*earlier* column. This is legal b/c it is surrounded by parens.  
However, it seems that the preprocessing approaches will fail for this  
example. Do you have a workaround?

--Yitzhak


On Jun 12, 2009, at 11:43 AM, Andreas Rossberg wrote:

> On Jun 12, 2009, at 10.20 h, Andrej Bauer wrote:
>
>> I think I understand the general idea of inserting "virtual" tokens,
>> but the details confuse me still. So starting with
>>
>>> if True:
>>>    x = 3
>>>    y = (2 +
>>>      4 + 5)
>>> else:
>>>    x = 5
>>>    if False:
>>>        x = 8
>>>        z = 2
>>
>> Martin suggests the following:
>>
>>> {
>>> if True:
>>> ;
>>>   {
>>>   x = 3
>>>   ;
>>>   y = (2 +
>>>   ;
>>>     {
>>>     4 + 5)
>>>     }
>>>   }
>>> ;
>>> else:
>>> ;
>>>   {
>>>   x = 5
>>>   ;
>>>   if False:
>>>   ;
>>>       {
>>>       x = 8
>>>       ;
>>>       z = 2
>>>       }
>>>   }
>>> }
>>
>> I have two questions. Notice that the { ... } and ( ... ) need not be
>> correctly nested (in the top half), so how are we going to deal with
>> this? The second question is, why are there the separators after and
>> just before "else:". I would expect separators inside { .... }, but
>> not around "else".
>
> It depends on how exactly you define your layout rules. The usual  
> approach is to tie start of layout-sensitive blocks to particular  
> keywords -- this is essentially what Python and Haskell do. In that  
> case, the binding to y is not affected. Haskell's rules for optional  
> layout would rewrite your original program as
>
>>> if True:
>>>    {x = 3
>>>    ;y = (2 +
>>>      4 + 5)
>>> }else:
>>>    {x = 5
>>>    ;if False:
>>>        {x = 8
>>>        ;z = 2
>>> }}
>
> The basic rules are fairly simple:
>
> 1. Insert "{" (assume width 0) before the first token following a  
> layout keyword (usually ":" in Python). This opens a block.
>
> 2. As long as inside a block, insert ";" before each token that is  
> on the _same_ column as the current (i.e. innermost) "{".
>
> 3. A block ends as soon as you see a line whose first token is  
> _left_ of the current "{". Insert "}" before that token.
>
> Blocks can be nested, so you need to maintain a stack of starting  
> columns in the parser. Note that rule 3 may end several blocks at  
> once. EOF is treated as a token at column 0.
>
> The way I implemented this is by wrapping the ocamllex-generated  
> lexer with a function that compares each token's column with the top  
> of the layout stack and inserts auxiliary tokens as necessary.
>
> Haskell has another rule for inserting "}" if there would be a parse  
> error without it (this is to allow inline blocks). This rule is  
> pretty fudgy, and almost impossible to implement properly with a  
> conventional parser generator. IMO, the only sane way to reformulate  
> this rule is again to tie it to specific keywords, e.g. insert "}"  
> before "else" if missing. This can be implemented in the parser by  
> making closing braces optional in the right places.
>
> - Andreas
>
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--------------------------------------------------
Yitzhak Mandelbaum
AT&T Labs - Research

http://www.research.att.com/~yitzhak